Ethnic ecology

An anthropologist on the moon: Anthropology Blog.: Indigenous Ecology: breathe, although not notéis.

An anthropologist on the moon: Anthropology Blog.: Indigenous Ecology: breathe, although not notéis..

Indigenous Ecology: breathe, although not notéis.

“We call urihi nature, our land, our forest. We know you’re alive and that is a long life, much more than us. Thanks to Maxitari (the breath of the spirit of the earth) the forest is beautiful, the rain falls on it and always windy. Breathe, although not notéis ” Davi Kopenawa, Yanomami, Brazil.


“Tsi Yunwiyah. I am Cherokee. In the language of my people, ani yunwiyah, or Cherokee, as we call it, there is a word for earth: Eloheh, a term that also means “history”, “culture” and “religion.” Declaration Cherokee, United States.
In general, indigenous peoples have a holistic view of nature and human beings considered an integral part of the earth, not something alien to it. According to this idea, the land is fertile and alive entity that has an intrinsic value, and not utilitarian can not be a passive and inanimate matter that should be exploited for trade expansion and economic progress. The land for the Indians is not a beautiful landscape or a place to escape the weekend. ‘s your pantry, your guide, your source of life. 

“The environment is not separate from us, we are in it, as it is within us, we create and we create.” Davi Kopenawa, Yanomami, Brazil.
Advertisements
Categories: Ethnic ecology | 1 Comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.